Automotive Radar

Introduction

Radar technology is starting to be developed for use in motor vehicles, mainly in the interests of road safety:

  • Automatic Cruise Control 'long-range radar' operating at 77 GHz. This enables a vehicle to maintain a cruising distance from a vehicle in front.
  • Anti-collision 'short-range radar' operating at 24 GHz and 79 GHz. This is being developed as part of a system to warn the driver of a pending collision, enabling avoiding action to be taken. In the event where collision is inevitable, the vehicle may prepare itself (for example by applying brakes, pre-tensioning seat belts) to minimize injury to passengers and others.

ETSI develops standards for both Automatic Cruise Control radar and anti-collision radar.

Anti-collision radar

The anti-collision radar technology is intended to be marketed in two stages in Europe:

Temporary frequency band

A 'temporary' frequency band has been opened at 24 GHz, allowing equipment to be marketed in the short term. However, this band is also used by other radio services that would suffer interference if too many radar devices were operated simultaneously in the same area. For this reason, this band will be closed for the introduction of new devices before the usage becomes too dense.

In addition, the radar is required to be switched off within a certain distance of radio astronomy stations, to avoid interference. Currently this is achieved by manual intervention by the driver. An automatic de-activation mechanism will be required after a transition date.

European Commission Decision 2005/50/EC requires this band to be made available in all EU member states, and sets the requirements for the transition to the permanent band and for the introduction of automatic de-activation around radio astronomy sites.

Permanent frequency band

A 'permanent' band has been allocated at 79 GHz, allowing for long-term development of this radar service. European Commission Decision 2004/545/EC requires this band to be made available in all EU member states.



Our Role & Activities

ETSI develops standards for both Automatic Cruise Control radar and anti-collision radar. Automatic Cruise Control (ACC) Radar.

ETSI has published the following documents for ACC:

  • a System Reference Document (ETSI Technical Report TR 101 983) on the use of the radio frequency spectrum by ACC radar
  • a Harmonized Standard (EN 301 091) that can be used to enable such equipment to be placed on the market under the R&TTE Directive.

Anti-collision radar

ETSI has published the following documents for anti-collision radar:

24 GHz
  • System Reference Document TR 101 982
  • Harmonized Standard EN 302 288.

ETSI has updated the original version of EN 302 288 under European Commission mandate M/363 to include automatic de-activation around radio astronomy sites.

79 GHz
  • System Reference Document TR 102 263
  • ETSI is currently drafting Harmonized Standard EN 302 264.



Standards

The following is a list of recently published and frequently downloaded standards. Please use the ETSI Work Programme to find further related standards.

Standard No.Standard title
TR 101 983 Radio equipment to be used in the 76 GHz to 77 GHz band; System Reference Document for Short-Range Radar to be fitted on road infrastructure
EN 301 091 parts 1-2 Short Range Devices; Road Transport and Traffic Telematics (RTTT); Radar equipment operating in the 76 GHz to 77 GHz range;
TR 101 982 Radio equipment to be used in the 24 GHz band; System Reference Document for automotive collision warning Short Range Radar
EN 302 288 parts 1-2 Short Range Devices; Road Transport and Traffic Telematics (RTTT); Short range radar equipment operating in the 24 GHz range;
TR 102 263 Road Transport and Traffic Telematics (RTTT); Radio equipment to be used in the 77 GHz to 81 GHz band; System Reference Document for automotive collision warning Short Range Radar
EN 302 264 Short Range Devices, Road Transport and Traffic Telematics (RTTT); Ultra Wide Band Radar Equipment Operating above 60 GHz